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Gun issue sparks local discussion

The Parthenon

Published: Friday, January 25, 2013

Updated: Friday, January 25, 2013 13:01

Recent shootings across the United States have stimulated public debate on the controversial issue of gun control, which is being addressed in Washington, local communities and campuses like Marshall.

President Obama, along with New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and other political leaders, are advocating a new law that would reinstate an assault weapons ban and set restrictions on gun and ammunition buyers.

Many Republicans have rejected Obama’s proposal, saying it is an attack on the constitutional right to bear arms.

The deep discussions on the issue, at the national level, are reflected in the views of many Marshall students around campus.

“It is unconstitutional to take away everyone’s second amendment right,” Adam Mendez, senior business major, said. “Even if Congress were to ban gun and ammunition sales, people who wanted them bad enough would find a way to get them,”

Matthew Pickett, a graduate student and Marshall football player, said it is important for citizens to be able to keep constitutional rights. “If you try to take guns away, criminals will still find a way to get them, and the recent tragedies were caused by the person not the weapon,” Picket said.

Shelby Lee, a social work major from Virginia Beach Va., shares a similar opinion. “All of these tragic shootings have a lot more to do with an absolute disrespect for the value of human life than they do guns,” Lee said.

Katie Potts, a sophomore volleyball player from Atlanta, Ga., studies criminal justice at Marshall and supports Obama’s new package. “I think the only people that should own guns are law enforcement officials, military personnel or citizens that have gone through extensive background checks,” Potts said.  “Guns, in my opinion, give people a sense of entitlement over defenseless citizens and ultimately have caused a number of tragic issues that have deeply affected this country.”

Angus Walsh, senior advertising major from Arlington, Va., said he sees both sides of the issue. “I think that there needs to be restraints on sizes of magazines and types of guns people should own,” Walsh said. “No one needs automatic assault rifles with 100 clip magazines.”

The Huntington Police Department was contacted for a comment and declined.

Congress has yet to make any new decisions regarding gun laws, and gun control remains a hotly debated issue.

Recent shootings across the United States have stimulated public debate on the controversial issue of gun control, which is being addressed in Washington, local communities and campuses like Marshall.

President Obama, along with New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and other political leaders, are advocating a new law that would reinstate an assault weapons ban and set restrictions on gun and ammunition buyers.

Many Republicans have rejected Obama’s proposal, saying it is an attack on the constitutional right to bear arms.

The deep discussions on the issue, at the national level, are reflected in the views of many Marshall students around campus.

“It is unconstitutional to take away everyone’s second amendment right,” Adam Mendez, senior business major, said. “Even if Congress were to ban gun and ammunition sales, people who wanted them bad enough would find a way to get them,”

Matthew Pickett, a graduate student and Marshall football player, said it is important for citizens to be able to keep constitutional rights. “If you try to take guns away, criminals will still find a way to get them, and the recent tragedies were caused by the person not the weapon,” Picket said.

Shelby Lee, a social work major from Virginia Beach Va., shares a similar opinion. “All of these tragic shootings have a lot more to do with an absolute disrespect for the value of human life than they do guns,” Lee said.

Katie Potts, a sophomore volleyball player from Atlanta, Ga., studies criminal justice at Marshall and supports Obama’s new package. “I think the only people that should own guns are law enforcement officials, military personnel or citizens that have gone through extensive background checks,” Potts said.  “Guns, in my opinion, give people a sense of entitlement over defenseless citizens and ultimately have caused a number of tragic issues that have deeply affected this country.”

Angus Walsh, senior advertising major from Arlington, Va., said he sees both sides of the issue. “I think that there needs to be restraints on sizes of magazines and types of guns people should own,” Walsh said. “No one needs automatic assault rifles with 100 clip magazines.”

The Huntington Police Department was contacted for a comment and declined.

Congress has yet to make any new decisions regarding gun laws, and gun control remains a hotly debated issue.

Ana Wilker can be reached at Wilker@marshall.edu.

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